Superluminal Motion in the M87 Jet

Superluminal Motion in the M87 Jet


TextPress Release Text
Hubble Detects Faster-Than-Light Motion in Galaxy M87
January 6, 1999
J. Biretta (ST ScI)


Click on image for larger version.


GIF (100kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. TOP PANEL: Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the box indicates where the superluminal motions were seen. BOTTOM PANEL: Sequence of Hubble images showing motion at six times the speed of light. The slanting lines track the moving features, and the speeds are given in units of the velocity of light ``c." The images were made between 1994 and 1998 with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (100kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. TOP PANEL: Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the box indicates where the superluminal motions were seen. BOTTOM PANEL: Sequence of Hubble images showing motion at six times the speed of light. The scale bar is 24 light years long, which is approximately the distance the clouds appear to travel in 4 years. The images were made between 1994 and 1998 with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (100kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. TOP PANEL: Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the box indicates where the superluminal motions were seen. BOTTOM PANEL: Sequence of Hubble images showing motion at six times the speed of light. The scale bar is 24 light years long, which is approximately the distance the clouds appear to travel in 4 years. The images were made between 1994 and 1998 with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (100kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. TOP PANEL: Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the box indicates where the superluminal motions were seen. BOTTOM PANEL: Sequence of Hubble images showing motion at six times the speed of light. The slanting lines track the moving features, and the speeds are given in units of the velocity of light ``c." The images were made between 1994 and 1998 with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (100kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. TOP PANEL: Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the box indicates where the superluminal motions were seen. BOTTOM PANEL: Sequence of Hubble images showing motion at six times the speed of light. The scale bar is 24 light years long, which is approximately the distance the clouds appear to travel in 4 years. The images were made between 1994 and 1998 with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

MPG (1280kB MPEG VIDEO) Video of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

MPG (1310kB MPEG VIDEO Large format version 600x392 pixels. May require setting frame rate to about 10 frames per sec, and setting ``play all frames,'' to get acceptible results.) Video of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light in the galaxy M87. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

The following are raw images without other graphics (no lines, lettering, etc.).


GIF (16kB GIF) Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the ``faster-than-light" motions were seen the bright spot next to the nucleus. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (16kB GIF) Hubble image showing jet streaming out from the galaxy's nucleus [bright round region at far left]. The jet is about 5000 light years long, and the ``faster-than-light" motions were seen the bright spot next to the nucleus. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (68kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light. The images were made between 1994 [top] and 1998 [bottom] with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (60kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light. The images were made between 1994 [top] and 1998 [bottom] with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (50kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light. The images were made between 1994 [top] and 1998 [bottom] with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

GIF (94kB GIF) Sequence of Hubble images showing apparent motion at six times the speed of light. The images were made between 1994 [top] and 1998 [bottom] with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. PHOTO CREDIT: John Biretta, Space Telescope Science Institute.

For additional materials contact John Biretta, biretta@stsci.edu, (410)-338-4917.


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