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Hubble Space Telescope
XMM-Newton Joint Program Information

XMM-Newton Cycle 11/HST Cycle 20
Joint Program Overview

By agreement with the HST Project, the XMM-Newton Project may award up to 30 orbits of HST observing time eachobserving cycle. Similarly, the HST Project may award up to 150 ks of XMM-Newton time. The time will be awarded only for highly ranked proposals that require the use of both observatories and shall not apply to usage of archival data. The only criterion above and beyond the usual review criteria is that both sets of data are required to meet the primary science goals. Proposers should have taken special care in justifying both the scientific and technical reasons for requesting observing time on both missions. For these solicitations, no HST time will be allocated without the need for XMM-Newton time on the same target to complete the proposed investigation.

For XMM-Newton's Cycle 11 and HST's Cycle 20, the XMM-Newton Observing Time Allocation Committee (OTAC) met in the fall of 2011 and reviewed their proposals. The following six joint XMM-Newton proposals (listed below) have been approved for execution in HST Cycle 20. These observations will be processed during the normal HST cycle ingest after the HST Telescope Allocation Committee (TAC) meets in May of 2012 with results released to the community by mid-June.


The Stellar Population Around the Intermediate Mass Black Hole ESO 243-49 HLX-1

Dr Sean Farrell
The University of Sydney
Program ID: 12979

We request joint XMM-Newton and HST observations of the best intermediate mass black hole candidate HLX-1. Recent HST and Swift observations found the broadband spectral energy distribution was well described by an irradiated accretion disc plus a stellar population. However, degeneracies in the models resulted in two acceptable solutions with dramatically different parameter values. We request two observations to be performed with XMM-Newton and the HST at different X-ray luminosities in order to break these model degeneracies using the variability of the disc emission. With these 2 - 5 orbit observations we will be able to determine the nature of the environment around the black hole, test formation theories for HLX-1, and rule out beaming as the origin of the extreme luminosities.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 ACS/SBC F140LP(2796s)
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 WFC3/UVIS F300X (1588s), F336W (1626s), F390W (1665s),
F555W (1668s), F621M (1664s), F775W (1660s)
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 WFC3/IR F105W (1359s), F160W (1359s) 5
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 ACS/SBC F140LP(2796s)
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 WFC3/UVIS F300X (1588s), F336W (1626s), F390W (1665s),
F555W (1668s), F621M (1664s), F775W (1660s)
ESO 243-49 HLX-1 01 10 28.3 -46 04 22 WFC3/IR F105W (1359s), F160W (1359s) 5

XMM-Newton Target of Opportunity of Tidal Disruption Events

Dr Andrew Levan
University of Warwick
Program ID: 13026

Tidal disruption events (TDEs), where a star is disrupted by a massive black hole provide a unique probe. They illuminate dynamics in galactic nuclei, and may provide constraints on rates of low frequency gravitational wave transients. A handful of candidates have been uncovered, with our recent discovery of a new class of relativistic TDE dramatically adding to the breadth of the population. Here we propose to characterise the spectral and temporal properties of of up to two TDEs found in AO11. As part of a multiwavelength campaign we will use XMM-Newton and HST to track the temperature; search for evidence of non-thermal components and study the long and short timescale variability. In doing so we will create unique panchromatic pictures of these events for the first time.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
TDE1 00 00 00.0 00 00 00 WFC3/UVIS F225W and F275W 2
TDE2 00 00 00.0 00 00 00 WFC3/UVIS F225W and F275W 2


The Extreme X-Ray Weakness of PG 0043+039

Dr Norbert Schartel
XMM-Newton SOC, ESA
Program ID: 12952

The majority of broad absorption line quasars are X-ray weak which is usually explained by the absorption of the out-flowing wind in combination with the winds velocity shear. PG 0043-036 is the most extreme X-ray weak quasar known to date, but shows surprisingly only a very weak broad absorption line system. A conclusive interpretation is hampered by the absence of simultaneous measurements which is mandatory as both, the X-ray flux and the broad absorption system are known to be variable. We propose simultaneous XMM-Newton, HST (1 orbit) and 10m Hobby-Eberly or SALT Telescope observations in order to characterize simultaneously PG 0043-036’s X-ray emission and (broad) absorption (line system) properties.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
PG 0043+039 00 45 47.2 +04 10 23 COS G140L (1120-2246A) 1

Catching AGN in Deep Minimum States to Unveil Their Core Environment

Dr Norbert Schartel
XMM-Newton SOC, ESA
Program ID: 12953

The deep minimum state of AGNs is characterized by a strongly suppressed or even absent primary continuum. As the continuum disappears weak spectral features like relativistic iron lines or narrow soft X-ray emission lines from ionised plasmas become highly significant and their parameters can be determined. Therefore deep minimum states offer unique possibilities to investigate in detail the physics of the reprocessed components in AGN, including the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole. Applying our experience (several deep minimum observations) we propose two triggered 10ks XMM snapshot, one 80ks XMM follow-up and one HST (2 orbit) observation of an AGN in deep minimum state. We will identify deep minimum states based on Swift and XMM-Newton slew observations.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
AGN 00 00 00 00 00 00 COS E130M and G160M 2

Physics of Black Hole Transients from Simultaneous X-Ray and UV Observations

Ms Alexandra Veledina
University of Oulu
Program ID: 12919

Fundamental questions concerning processes in the vicinity of black holes (BH) remain open. The accretion flow geometry, the role of the jet and the source of optical radiation are among most disputed. In recent years, simultaneous infrared/optical/ultraviolet--X-ray observations revealed their large potential in addressing these problems. By joining two powerful astrophysical techniques: (a) high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and timing (which only XMM-Newton can provide) and (b) high time-resolution UV photometry (available only at HST), we will answer a number of fundamental questions of BH physics. We will constrain the accretion flow geometry, measure the inner disc radius, identify the source of seed photons for Comptonization, and locate the zone of the UV emission.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
New BH Transient 00 00 00.0 00 00 00 COS G140L 2
Swift^J1753.5-0127 17 53 28.3 -01 27 09 COS G140L 2

Testing the Paradigm of X-Ray Driven Exoplanet Evaporation with XMM+HST

Dr Peter Wheatly
University of Warwick
Program ID: 12920

HST observations show that two of the brightest transiting exoplanets are evaporating (HD209458b & HD189733b) and models suggest that the evolution of close-in planets may be dominated by this mass loss. It is believed that the evaporation is driven by X-ray irradiation of the planet by its parent star, but a lack of simultaneous measurements of irradiation and evaporation prevents a meaningful test of this model. We propose simultaneous XMM-Newton and HST observations of three transits of the brightest X-ray source, HD189733, in order to test the paradigm of X-ray driven evaporation and make a direct measurement of the efficiency of exoplanet evaporation.

TARGET NAME RA DEC CONFIG FILTERS ORBITS
HD189733 20 00 43.7 +22 42 39 STIS/FUV G140M (1222A) 3
HD189733 20 00 43.7 +22 42 39 STIS/FUV G140M (1222A) 3
HD189733 20 00 43.7 +22 42 39 STIS/FUV G140M (1222A) 3