Space Telescope Science Institute
Call for Proposals and HST Primer
help@stsci.edu
Table of Contents Previous Next Print


Hubble Space Telescope Call for Proposals for Cycle 22 > Chapter 1: General Information > 1.2 New and Important Features of Cycle 22

1.2 New and Important Features of Cycle 22
Cycle 21 observations will end on September 30, 2014, and Cycle 22 will extend from October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015. We will accept proposals for the following instruments: ACS, COS, FGS, STIS, and WFC3.
What’s New for Cycle 22
COS Lifetime Position. By the start of Cycle 22, it is expected that COS FUV spectra will have been moved from the second COS Lifetime Position (LP2) to the third (LP3) in order to ameliorate the continuing effects of gain sag. While the exact change in performance is not yet known, it is anticipated that the typical spectral resolution (λ/Δλ) may decline by about 15%. Depending on the details of the LP3 implementation, it is possible that the resolution decline for the COS FUV G140L grating may be somewhat larger.
Joint HST-NRAO Proposals are being introduced in this cycle, allowing proposers to request time on both HST and NRAO facilities in a single proposal. For a joint HST-NRAO proposal to be successful, the project must be fundamentally of a multi-wavelength nature and must require all proposed observations to meet the science goals. Proposers should take special care to justify both the scientific and technical reasons for all observations included in their joint proposal. Proposers must always check whether appropriate archival data exist, and provide clear scientific and technical justification for any new observations of previously observed targets. Further details are given in Section 3.9.
The MAST Data Discovery Portal was released in November 2013 at http://mast.stsci.edu/explore. The Discovery Portal is a one-stop Web interface to access data from all of MAST’s supported missions, including HST, Kepler, GALEX, FUSE, IUE, EUVE, and Swift-UVOT. In addition to data at MAST, users can search for data available through the Virtual Observatory (VO), either by providing a resolvable target name or coordinate, or by using the "Search the VO" button for a given MAST data product. The VO gives Portal users access to data spanning the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to high energy, including images, spectra, catalogs, and NASA ADS records.
Important Features Carried Over From the Previous Cycle
Medium Proposals (those requesting between 35 and 74 orbits) are being continued as a separate proposal category (see Section 3.2.2). General Observer (GO) Proposals are classified as Small (1-34 orbits), Medium (35-74 orbits) or Large (75 or more orbits) based on orbit request. Medium Proposals are reviewed by the panels and ranked together with the Small Proposals. Those making the cut proceed to the TAC where a separate orbit pool is available for them. This pool is nominally 600 orbits in size, although the TAC has the ability to decrease or increase this number in order to balance the pressure between Medium and Large Proposals.
The Ultraviolet (UV) Initiative introduced in Cycle 21 will continue in Cycle 22. This initiative is designed to take full advantage of the unique UV capabilities of Hubble while they still exist. It uses orbit allocation targets to increase the share of primary GO observing time dedicated to UV observations (central wavelengths < 3200 Angstroms). Small (Section 3.2.1), Medium (Section 3.2.2), Large (Section 3.2.3), and Treasury (Section 3.2.6) GO Proposals are all eligible, but SNAP Proposals are not. The available UV instrument modes include ACS/SBC imaging, COS spectroscopy, STIS/MAMA imaging and spectroscopy, STIS/CCD spectroscopy (UV gratings only) and WFC3/UVIS imaging (UV filters only; this does not include F336W, the U-band filter). More details are given in Section 6.3.
The UV Initiative also extends to Archival (AR) Proposals, in the Regular AR (Section 3.4.1), Legacy AR (Section 3.4.2), and Theory (Section 3.4.4) categories. STScI will ask the review panels and the TAC to give particular consideration to UV-specific AR Proposals in the review process. More details are given in Section 6.3.
The STScI Director has devoted a significant fraction of his discretionary time in Cycles 21, 22, and 23 to a New Frontiers Program. This involves deep imaging observations of six moderate-redshift galaxy clusters and offset blank fields using ACS and WFC3 operating in parallel. Further details are given at the New Frontiers website. Data taken for the New Frontiers Program have no proprietary period, and the community is encouraged to submit AR Proposals, Theory Proposals, and supplementary GO Proposals for the scientific exploitation of these data.
Joint HST-Spitzer Proposals are available (see Section 3.6), although Spitzer Cycle 11 operations are contingent on the results of the NASA 2014 Senior Review. Up to 60 hours of time on the Spitzer Space Telescope may be awarded to joint HST-Spitzer Programs in this cycle. Proposed projects must be of a fundamentally multi-wavelength nature, and both HST and Spitzer observations must be required to meet the science goals. Proposers may request up to 20 hours of Spitzer Cycle 11 time in any one HST proposal.
We remind users that an extensive catalog of High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) is hosted on the MAST archive HLSP webpage, including imaging and spectroscopic atlases of many classes of astronomical object. HLSPs are community-contributed, fully-processed images and spectra that are ready for scientific analysis. The HLSP catalog is a useful resource for preparing new proposals. In addition, agreeing to provide new HLSPs back to MAST can increase a proposal’s scientific value and hence its chance of success (this is a requirement for Treasury GO and Legacy AR Proposals).
We remind users that a set of imaging and spectroscopic tools is incorporated into MAST for quick-look analysis of existing HST data. The spectroscopic tools allow flux-calibrated spectra from multiple HST instruments to be displayed simultaneously, and provide a useful resource for duplication checking and exposure time calculations for new observing proposals.
As detailed in Section 10.12, NASA has the "first right of refusal" for all Hubble news releases.  STScI Public Outreach news officers should be made aware of potentially newsworthy science results before the acceptance of HST publications. Proposers are reminded that STScI and NASA can provide considerable resources to support the creation and distribution of press releases.
Disruptive ToOs are defined as those with turn-around times of less than three weeks. The number of activations of disruptive ToOs is limited to eight in Cycle 22. There is no limit to the number of activations of non-disruptive ToOs. See Section 4.1.2 for details.
Proposers may apply for Long-Term status (up to two cycles) for Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) Programs that target objects with a low probability of occurrence during one cycle (see Section 4.1.2).
Large GO Proposals must use the shorter orbital visibility values from Table 6.1 of the HST Primer, which will be enforced for any of these programs approved for Phase II.
Data taken for all Large and Treasury Programs will have no proprietary period by default. Proposers may request a proprietary period, and that request should be justified in the ‘Special Requirements’ section of the proposal (see Section 9.3). Such a request will be subject to review by the TAC.
HST data can be searched and obtained both through the standard HST Search Form and through the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA). Proprietary data can only be retrieved by authorized users via the standard search form, though the outline of these observations can be displayed via the Footprints tool in the HLA. For public data, the HLA offers a graphical search interface, image and spectral preview capabilities, mosaic combinations, enhanced data products, as well as source lists for ACS, WFPC2, and WFC3 observations.

Hubble Space Telescope Call for Proposals for Cycle 22 > Chapter 1: General Information > 1.2 New and Important Features of Cycle 22

Table of Contents Previous Next Print