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STScI Newsletter
2024 / Volume 41 / Issue 01

About this Article

Ann Jenkins (jenkins[at]stsci.edu)

Members of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) will participate in the 244th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at the Monona Terrace Convention Center in Madison, Wisconsin, June 9–13. This will be a joint meeting with the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD).

The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) serves the astronomical community through the operation of multiple NASA flagship missions including the Hubble Space Telescope, James Webb Space Telescope, and Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope; the development of advanced data and science archives, including Kepler, K2, GALEX and TESS; and the dissemination of astronomical information to the broadest public audiences. STScI provides support to the community and is the primary user interface for Hubble and JWST. It will perform that role for imaging with the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) on Roman.

Throughout the week, members of STScI will be involved in a wide variety of science and technical presentations, press releases, and press conferences. An exhibit booth and several associated events will highlight the missions we support on behalf of the science community. Please visit the booth to explore other STScI activities.

The STScI Town Hall will report on the status of our existing and upcoming missions and describe new opportunities designed to advance astrophysics through the 2020s. Ample time will be available to confer with experts from Webb, Hubble, Roman, and MAST.

STScI-Related Workshops, Events, and Sessions
Title and Description Date and Time (CT) Location

Demo: Jdaviz

Demonstration of the JWST astronomical data analysis tools in the Jupyter platform

Monday, June 10

5:00-5:30 p.m.

 

Wednesday, June 12

9:00-9:30 a.m.
JWST booth
The Roman Data Monitoring Tool: Automated Scientific Data Quality Checking and Anomaly Detection for Large Data (iPoster)
With a planned launch in 2026, the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope’s primary objective is to use the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) to survey large regions of the sky, with some surveys including regular repeat visits to probe the time domain. The 18 detectors of WFI will produce 11 terabytes of science data per day. All of these data must be calibrated and publicly released soon after arriving at the Science Operations Center (SOC). The Roman Data Monitoring Tool (RDMT) will enable the SOC to monitor the pixel-level quality of the WFI data.

Monday, June 10

5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall

Roman Space Telescope Observing Program Implementation (iPoster)
Roman will be used to survey the sky over its 5-year primary mission. The SOC at STScI will manage the implementation of all approved Roman observing programs. Building on the processes, procedures, and software used in the management of HST and JWST observing programs, the Roman observing program implementation process has been designed to support Roman’s unique survey capabilities.

Monday, June 10

5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall A

JWST Science Highlights
Well into its second year of science operations, JWST keeps fulfilling its promise of revolutionizing all fields of astronomy. This Exhibitor Hall contribution will review some JWST scientific highlights — from the solar system to the most distant galaxies — while emphasizing recent data processing updates that have had a positive impact on the data. 

Tuesday, June 11
12:00–12:30 p.m.
Exhibitor Theater, Exhibit Hall A

 The Roman Space Telescope Science Operations Center (iPoster)
With its enormous survey speeds and data rates, Roman presents new challenges in data handling, processing, and archiving. STScI is the Roman Science Operations Center (SOC), and is responsible for the planning and scheduling of all observations, as well as for WFI data processing and the generation of data products for WFI imaging. The SOC will also host the Roman Archive, and will make available a Roman Science Platform, which is being designed to enable community access to and efficient analysis of Roman data products in the cloud. All data products, including image-level and catalog-level products, will be made available to the community with no exclusive access period.

Wednesday, June 12

9:00–10:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall A

The Roman Space Telescope Science Operations Center

With its enormous survey speeds and data rates, Roman presents new challenges in data handling, processing, and archiving. STScI is the Roman Science Operations Center (SOC), and is responsible for the planning and scheduling of all observations, as well as for WFI data processing and the generation of data products for WFI imaging. The SOC will also host the Roman Archive, and will make available a Roman Science Platform, which is being designed to enable community access to and efficient analysis of Roman data products in the cloud. All data products, including image-level and catalog-level products, will be made available to the community with no exclusive access period.

Wednesday, June 12
12:00–12:30 p.m.
Exhibitor Theater, Exhibit Hall A

STScI Town Hall
This event will serve as the centerpiece for our AAS 244 presence. We will report on the status of our existing and upcoming missions and describe new opportunities designed to advance astrophysics through the 2020s. In particular, we will discuss future plans for HST and JWST, the Roman science platform, and prospects for transient science with all three observatories. Presenters will include STScI science leads and community representatives. Time will be available for discussion to receive community input regarding new capabilities and to answer questions about our activities in the coming year.

Wednesday, June 12

12:45–1:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall

Overview of JWST NIRISS Science (iPoster)

The Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) onboard JWST offers four independent observing modes to enable scientific observations from our own solar system to the edge of the universe. We present the current quality of the NIRISS science data products, planned calibration improvements expected to be available over the next six months, and pointers to Jupyter notebook tutorials to illustrate how to reduce and analyze NIRISS data for scientific analysis.

Wednesday, June 12

5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall A

Performance Status and General Updates for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (iPoster)

The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard HST continues to deliver high quality science from both its imaging and spectroscopic modes across a wavelength range spanning from the far UV into the near IR. This poster presents nominal instrument health and status results from the recent cycle 30 calibration programs. It discusses updated STIS values and files for the HST exposure time calculator, the time dependent sensitivity in the near UV, and the flux calibration in certain modes. Lastly, it highlights the recent Hubble Advanced Spectral Products (HASP) program which produces coadded and abutted spectra from STIS and HST's Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (COS) data for the community.

Wednesday, June 12

5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall A

Twenty-Two Years of the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys: Calibration Update (iPoster)
The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) has been a workhorse Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imager for over 22 years, subsequent to its Servicing Mission 3B installation in 2002. The ACS Solar Blind Channel (SBC) continues to offer unique access to high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging in the far-UV with its Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector. The once defunct ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) has now been operating thrice as long (>15yrs) since its Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) repair than it had originally operated prior to its 2007 electronics failure. Despite the accumulating radiation damage to the WFC CCDs during their long stay in low Earth orbit, ACS remains heavily exploited by the HST community as both a prime and a parallel detector, and now by the JWST community for its matched spatial resolution at optical wavelengths. Ongoing detector-calibration efforts by the STScI ACS Team consistently deliver the highest level of performance to the ACS users.


We present results from the latest studies of detector performance for both WFC and SBC, including long-term monitoring of WFC and SBC dark current, WFC readout noise, and WFC CCD pixel stability. We also advertise updated ACS documentation and software tools for the user community.

Wednesday, June 12

5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall A

Updated Status and Performance of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (iPoster)

Updates on the current status and performance of Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard HST and a summary of recent calibration and user support work of interest to all COS users. First, reporting on new geometric and walk corrections which will be made available soon with corresponding updated calibration reference files. Second, updated time-dependent sensitivity corrections for both the FUV and NUV based on regular monitoring. Third, reporting that shows that the dark rates continue to be atypically high, as expected due to the peaking solar activity in 2024, but are largely unchanged from the last update to the dark rates.
Wednesday, June 12
5:30–6:30 p.m.
Exhibit Hall A

Exploring the early universe with future Roman Ultra Deep Field observations (iPoster)

Among the new areas of observational discovery space that could be opened up by Roman is the potential for carrying out Roman Ultra Deep Field observations, reaching UDF-quality depths up to about 30th magnitude, over degree-scale areas. This would greatly increase the discovery space for samples of high-redshift galaxies and AGN in the epoch of reionization, vastly increasing the sample sizes of these rare sources compared to previous HST results, and providing excellent complementarity with the latest JWST surveys. Moreover, targeting Euclid and Rubin deep fields with Roman Ultra Deep Field observations would enable additional synergies in time-domain science and multiband imaging, crucial in expanding the discovery space of rare populations of sources in the early universe, and understanding their formation and evolution.

Thursday, June 13
9:00–10:00 a.m.
Exhibit Hall A

 

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